Therapy (Pulling Red Thread)

Wikipedia Poem, No. 483

wiki483

   dazzle in bayonne
them i 
spot the battleship a 
brave 
   thing in me 
but 
      better in college 

baionnette
bayonne
diminutive bayon

i am a 
human who 
     sits unlike a trough 
purchased long at 
the 
      academic front leaking

a long narrow open container 
for animals 
to eat or drink 
out of

        control 
    frightens
thought

thread-eye
rarely painted red

‘Another variation of formlessness’

“Isn’t the most profound education the one that was afforded me at my childhood elementary school, the one that divides the ink sharply between thought become Letter and drive turned into splotches and blots? How will those who begin with the darkish gray on the palish gray of computer screens manage? Without the slightest inkblot? Won’t they think that thought is just another variation of formlessness, that the intellect is just a thin additional coat of gray over the gray of drive, and drive a mere stripping of the gray of the intellect?

Everything in the world is the result of a creative and careful dosing of black as it is projected onto the formidable invariability of white. Anyone who hasn’t experienced this, and sooner rather than later, will never learn anything.”

— from the essay “Chalk and Markers” in Alain Badiou’s “Black”.

Salty

Wikipedia Poem, No. 458

JMG_9196-sm

“Their bodies were dragged through the streets and covered in heaps of salt to underline the point.” Sarah Bakewell

killed their bodies 
     for five earrings 
        me in the streets expensive 
      me
the streets 
        setting 
      fire 
      taking 
me
into the streets setting fire 
to warn 
worn like worms 
         to 
worn 
         tax 
collectors houses some 
attacked 
       to 
protest and soak 
  their 
      chalky white skin in heaps of rebels emblazoned 
with carved jade
        
     cabochon rubies 
and expensive days of protest 
      and soaks his chalky 
      white 
skin 
into a generally 
peasant 
uprising a few tax 
  collectors houses gone and some 
covered in 18k gold
my wrists worn 
   to protest and expensive days
of pleasant protest

x+1 of 100 (after Matisse’s Piano Lesson)

1-of-100-sm-matte

1 of 100

LEYELP
half-thinking
willfully lets go

being construct-
ed; persp-
ective—
archival

figuration of size
metronome
boy, half-finished
hung in the distance
femme au tabouret
la femme assise
candlestick
figure of woman
hands engulfed
outdoors
beyond
window flattened
a tone
leaf
white oak
inside flat gray
decisive
wrought iron

pile of
debris

bedframe
balcony rail

2 of 100

of
debris

bedframe
boy, half-thinking
willfully
let’s go

bedframe
boy
half-finished
hung
in the distance

femme au
tabouret
assise
candlestick
figuration
PLEYEL
half-finished
half-hung

in the distance
la femme

“The Struggles of Words”, 1928, by Pierre Reverdy

Torment wanders into the light beyond the roof. At midday, without sunlight. The walls are covered with snow, against a gray background. The eye stops and vainly seeks a better path.

They’ve rubbed away the designs that gave life to the crumbling walls. Some words raise themselves affirmatively. And the flood, too high, carries off the shore where the grass smooths the bank into well-combed hair. And while across the bluish rays turbulences whirl and slowly rise, silence falls heavily on the ground, without breaking.

— Pierre Reverdy (1889-1960), trans. Michael Benedikt

Wikipedia Poem, No. 349

wiki349

“They’ve rubbed away the designs that gave life to the crumbling walls. Some words raise themselves affirmatively.” Pierre Reverdy

   destructive 
  destructive 
      
        founded basin 
    there but 
exploding 
         
         destructive   
 and 
deeper 
 
         diagram 
than 
  that is 
there but exploding 
        
        destructivity feeds the
  case may be
      
a river 
  from the 
geological society 

     would 
exploding 
      destructive 
        
        destructivity 
      feed the 
   pressure 
in 
        that 
instance 
      there
  without 
 lakes

Wikipedia Poem, No. 327

wiki327

After James Schuyler, lilac dandelion curve sublime moment trench coat gorilla

 

itself any red
utt when readymade
which it is not

clear bottles whether lhooq
citation needed names
r mutter means poverty

poetry peace possibility
or french much like eut été
in mind of the r

mutts
are difficult to pin
down precisely

it is a play on itself
and in the mind of capital
and utt rm and lowercase means

poverty poetry
peace possibility
or french much like eut été in mind

the scatological golden calf
the fountain
itself any lowercase letters

mean
poverty
poetry peace possibility or

freytag-loringhoven in french
making if any
richard in

german armut
meaning the
beautiful cedarn fountain itself and the urinal

itself any and also on itself
any lowercase letter means poverty
poetry peace possibility

although
duchamp’s lhooq citation of the famous
commercial origins and also

on its commercial origins
and lowercase letters
meaning if we

separate the meaning
poverty poetry peace possibility
from lhooq citation needed

name r mutt rn and in german in general
armut meaning any if any lowercase
letters meaning poverty poetry peace possibly

meandering ur-mutt and jeff
making levi another if and jeff
meaning rs mutter meaning if

Wikipedia Poem, No. 249

wiki249

“Does … hope [pervade] our century? Perhaps, but poetry does not confirm that impression, and it is a more reliable witness than journalism. If something cannot be verified on a deeper level, that of poetry, it is not, we may suspect, authentic.” Czeslaw Milosz

 

disdain greek daimonion
a divine principle in the original
mythological sense using it

render to the demon what is his old
english feend or dest-inctions and
vulgate bulging god of eyes

fat hen and vulgate fortune
a loved toy church fathers
and vulgate for purposes of deuil

christian greek daimonion in hellcniht
literally hellcniht literally hellcniht literally
hellcniht hellcniht hell hell hell literally hell

of poets’ come
though it’s where
that must be he

the disclosure of poetry
is rightly said to be
the disclosure of poets

though it’s there where
that he must be
an exaggeration

to maintain that he must be
he a disclosure put to
shame by the daimonion

though it’s why poets come
it’s an exaggeration i guess
to say poets come from shame

john hepburn is dead
force of white dying
a gay brother the seafarer

and during sodomy
the street coterie is known
the sex violent and convicted

as for sodomy who turns
who operates a seafarer
unruly offensive drummer boy

a business opportunity
provided by the reverend
sinister society anti-oedipus

the most sinister priest-manipulators
psychoanalysis as unanswerable
pilloried analysts in capitalist disorder

daimonion demonstrations
widely regarded as unanswerable
pilloried writers thinkers motorcycle

repairmen unanswerable and indicted
psychoanalysis as capitalist disorder
analysis pilloried and then indicted

an oiled lacanian camp in paris
literary critics pilloried become
unanswerable almost sinister

the priest-manifold tripartite thing
commissioned to be an american
academic and imaginary pleasure

chosen to embody the aesthetics
of a garbage dump he was himself
an era of absurdity in january

his photographs inspired
the british to subject germans
to vulgata aesthetics ad copy

daimonion burning pleasant 

paculum-spec2-sm

Sources:

  • “Demon.” Online Etymology Dictionary. 2001. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • “Lacanianism.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 6 Apr. 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • Miłosz, Czesław. Ars Poetica? 1988. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • Miłosz, Czesław. The Witness of Poetry. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1983. Print. Page 16.
  • “Slavoj Žižek.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 4 July 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • “Vere street coterie.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 9 Jan. 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.

Wikipedia Poem, No. 207

houellegun

 

years tardif se faire
le sens du dernier
a buzz of gone gods

where is clear la cour
suivra particules queue
nothing of his judged work

regret gone il ouvre
découvre dégagé perçons déplier hachurée
défaire ses lame de scie circulaire

he is briefly an extrovert
an island in the scope
exposed lattice work

sans la more rien dans l’absence
le sens du domain continuité éternel
of sans la mort of men unique

the author is here
his old age his body
rien est contemporain

 


Source: Betty, Louis. “The Poetics of Despair: A reading of Michel Houellebecq’s configuration du dernier rivage.” ANOBIUM, 5 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 May 2016.