Come: Debug

Wikipedia Poem, No. 706

come-debug-homer

“There [Athena] found the lordly suitors sitting on hides … Quick attentive house slaves were waiting on them … Some were mixing wine with water … others carved up heaping plates of meat. … Telemachus was sitting with them, feelings dejected. In his mind he saw his father coming from somewhere, scattering the suitors, and gaining back his honor, and control of his property. With this in his mind, he was the first to see Athena there.” The Odyssey, trans. Emily Wilson

ONE
    
   e 
ndkeg shwnn  tt'eng 
        
        e inhaw
      f geas d.c. el trta gks ovaklo bodon e 
e
          eeosemrl el
      
t 
s'l 
ert 
behonce

TWO

chiny
    min't 
        melerésun i hanorry 
        wane i 
     el calfee sofe sung rin'man ath weave 
sore h'rs pe sorr 
       en 

THREE

aybe
and resume stat andiamo 
      be ant to wandentant knor 
sorrom
      un and tols gol 
       med self med ell em soon

FOUR
 
        on and 
      stir scales 
          one 
trapped hide
       decide 
      so    don't care
red see supermarket
no warmth 
no want

FIVE

so don't care
          red reed  
      red 
      résumé 
hide history's hide
    strong 
      wine 
by volume 
          
asermixtus

SIX

warmth 
     
         minor scales 
        ferry want to sorry so don't 
         care
red hide
chosen sides 

SEVEN

  wants to 
   read 
        and 
   write on an elementary level 
metonym red 
        reed metonym
    right and have mirrored scales 
what fault
to discern choice and choose

EIGHT

         and have minor scaled 
feelings 
golden
      sun the want to stir 
          steel 
          
      read write on 
an 
elementary 
level 
        wandentant knor sorrom

NINE

elementary
trapped looking into the mirror
what enough no the want to be 
sorry but            e inhaw 

TEN

       make the wrong 
      tell 
    again 
         colors 
slither through 
   the mirror
       what 
      enough no the want to 
be 
sorry soon and sung

America

Wikipedia Poem, No. 667

america-sm2

an acquaintance
a friend
a neighbor
even

see especially women
friends and neighbors

seen especially as women
friends and rivals called to attend
the splicing of a useful rope to invoke
a less-useful loop

later familiar or idle talk
about our lingering smog of
eighteenth century exploitation

explode the old english godsibb
as in sponsored by an exploring god

Old English god “supreme being, deity; the Christian God; image of a god; godlike person,” from Proto-Germanic *guthan (source also of Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch god, Old High German got, German Gott, Old Norse guð, Gothic guþ), from PIE *ghut- “that which is invoked” (source also of Old Church Slavonic zovo “to call,” Sanskrit huta- “invoked,” an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)- “to call, invoke.” 1

then god’s toothful parent
not the true god but capitol
god of trifling talk
of groundless rumor

familiar formations
of the old universe
extended into middle-life

godparents dying
from dehydration
in kids r us

Lemniscate of Booth, at Speed

Wikipedia Poem, No. 356

W536

“We search for riches deep within the bowels of the earth where the spirits of the dead have their abode, as though the part we walk upon is not sufficiently bounteous and productive.” Pliny the Elder

It is. Are you?

or as a result
english pulling
verb from latin
grow property et cetera to fall
to someone as pain
from defective forms

Where do you want to go today?

an alternative verb
from the late 1570s
unless much growth
modern french noun from
advertising to be now-obsolete
grow by increments
of property of et cetera
until much many ofs

Why wait?

as it happens
in excrement
property possession et cetera
from the english verb accrue
by increments
of property pissant et cetera from
giants an old
french noun because there grows
property et cetera
from latin
accrescere accrescent accroître acreue
by unwitting we gain we fall into shape
into cord’s web

What would you do for a Klondike bar?

Wizards Fall

Wikipedia Poem, No. 501

parenthetically
a mean kind of english
wreccan driven out
outcast elend misery
reflecting one’s genetic survival
instinct outcast misery miserly

development of meaning
a sorry state in vile dallag erman
the old english drive
driven out punished person
exiled and remarkable
a strong sense of the vile

drive them out who strive for natural gifts
our vile reflection senses its spirit lift

Wikipedia Poem, No. 364

wiki364-sm

“I’m still waiting to burst forth.” Don DeLillo

noun bleached a 
    bleached 
gown unabridged from thesaurus 
        gratis on 
a long narrow committal 
         crown unabridged from the middle low 
        german old 

english dutch from the middle low 
  german 
       middle low german middle 
low german midge mycg mucca pluck the 
        history 
         of sharp narrow common 
cultured harp narrow committal 
crown proto
germanic unabridge the chicaner noun 
   bleach a bleached 
gown 
unabridged from the middle low 
german midge mycg mucca 

the chicanery 
      fooling and dueling 
diving 
   diving diving diving diving 
        diving in plain 
english diction chicane 
again presently all 
ultimate pseudoscience 
youth against the history of driving 
    diving diving into 
plain english diction 
          harp cultured narrow committal   crown 
chicanery fooling diving diving 
     diving 
diving chicane addictions 
     chicaning presently ultimately 
     pseudoscience 
   of a sharp narrow common candle  
fooling diving diving lithe diving diving 
         chicanery foolish diving driving 

salii 
sulla 
luna 

in 
      plain english 
diction chicane 

salii sulla luna 

presently all 
      ultimately pseudoscience

Wikipedia Poem, No. 356

wiki356-sm

 

lithuanian kenčiu
suffer what arouses
pity arouses pray

or sorrow from the greek
pathos suffer pakanta
grief sorrow from the weak

patience sorrow
from the proto indo
european kwent to suffer

endure source
also of old irish cessaim
i suffer and penthos suffer

endure irish suffering feeling
feeling feeding emotion calamity
literally what befalls one

Wikipedia Poem, No. 330

wiki330-cmp-sm2

“eventually / even scorched earth goes green though beneath it // the dead might still luxuriate in their rage my ancestor / was a dervish saint” Kaveh Akbar

 

luxure obsolete
from the whistling verb
float

rather the 1660s relay
reluctance lasting and
first attested sometime around

1661 lather reluctantly wrestle
stains see related lasciviousness
lust 1520 screams obsolescence

the verb first fury related
which attests sometime
in 1660 the king burns grace

which is reluctance latin relates
60 pounds of cake perhaps shake
shares a common origin with the greek lygos

pliant twig luxurie debauchery
dissoluteness lust 12c modern french
luxurie debauchery dislocated

arm relate the 1660s relate
14c lasciviousness leathered up
in reluctant magnificence

paculum-spec2-sm

Excerpt from Kaveh Akbar’s “River of Milk” used without permission, but with unconditional love, from the Poetry Foundation.

Wikipedia Poem, No. 329

wiki329-sm

“…there are too many supermarkets, with too many cashiers.” Mark Halliday

          passion passion passion passion passion 
      passion 
          passion 
latin a hostile sense
passion passion 
      passion passion passion passion passion passion passion passion passion passion 
    passion passion 
passion 
        passion 
passion passion passion 
passion passion passion passion passion passion 
      passion passion passion passion 
   passion passion passion passion passion passion 
passion passion passion passion 
passion 
         passion passion 
passion passion 
passion 
passion passion passion passion passion 
anti breathes anemos 
  passing passion passion passion passion 
passion passion passion 
passion passion

Wikipedia Poem, No. 249

wiki249

“Does … hope [pervade] our century? Perhaps, but poetry does not confirm that impression, and it is a more reliable witness than journalism. If something cannot be verified on a deeper level, that of poetry, it is not, we may suspect, authentic.” Czeslaw Milosz

 

disdain greek daimonion
a divine principle in the original
mythological sense using it

render to the demon what is his old
english feend or dest-inctions and
vulgate bulging god of eyes

fat hen and vulgate fortune
a loved toy church fathers
and vulgate for purposes of deuil

christian greek daimonion in hellcniht
literally hellcniht literally hellcniht literally
hellcniht hellcniht hell hell hell literally hell

of poets’ come
though it’s where
that must be he

the disclosure of poetry
is rightly said to be
the disclosure of poets

though it’s there where
that he must be
an exaggeration

to maintain that he must be
he a disclosure put to
shame by the daimonion

though it’s why poets come
it’s an exaggeration i guess
to say poets come from shame

john hepburn is dead
force of white dying
a gay brother the seafarer

and during sodomy
the street coterie is known
the sex violent and convicted

as for sodomy who turns
who operates a seafarer
unruly offensive drummer boy

a business opportunity
provided by the reverend
sinister society anti-oedipus

the most sinister priest-manipulators
psychoanalysis as unanswerable
pilloried analysts in capitalist disorder

daimonion demonstrations
widely regarded as unanswerable
pilloried writers thinkers motorcycle

repairmen unanswerable and indicted
psychoanalysis as capitalist disorder
analysis pilloried and then indicted

an oiled lacanian camp in paris
literary critics pilloried become
unanswerable almost sinister

the priest-manifold tripartite thing
commissioned to be an american
academic and imaginary pleasure

chosen to embody the aesthetics
of a garbage dump he was himself
an era of absurdity in january

his photographs inspired
the british to subject germans
to vulgata aesthetics ad copy

daimonion burning pleasant 

paculum-spec2-sm

Sources:

  • “Demon.” Online Etymology Dictionary. 2001. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • “Lacanianism.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 6 Apr. 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • Miłosz, Czesław. Ars Poetica? 1988. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • Miłosz, Czesław. The Witness of Poetry. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1983. Print. Page 16.
  • “Slavoj Žižek.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 4 July 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • “Vere street coterie.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 9 Jan. 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.

Wikipedia Poem, No. 176

dropsy1-01

“What the soul contributed was in a dream, touched very lightly, and merely licked and sprinkled, as it were, by the soft impression of the senses.” Montaigne

 

surname maudelen
from the early middle english fem.
proper name of a repentant sinner

for this tree-like fragrant
mostly white night-blooming
genera as shown indoors

in luke 7:37 in pain clinical
greenhouse the tall fluid
frequently forgiven

by thin-stemmed climbers
while shades of repentant sinners
locate determinate interstitium