‘Royalty’ by Arthur Rimbaud, trans. John Ashbery

First published in 1886, Arthur Rimbaud's Illuminations, the work of a poet who had abandoned poetry before the age of twenty-one, changed the language of poetry. Hallucinatory and feverishly hermetic, it is an acknowledged masterpiece of world literature, still unrivaled for its haunting blend of sensuous detail and otherworldly astonishment. In Ashbery's translation of this notoriously elusive text, the acclaimed poet and translator lends his inimitable voice to a venerated classic.
He died of cancer in a Marseilles hospital in 1891, still young — having in effect compressed what for others would have been a long lifetime of artistic revolution and exotic adventure into just 37 years.
Arthur Rimbaud was born in 1854 in Charleville, in the northeast of France close to the Belgian border, to a sour-tempered, repressively pious mother and a mostly absent soldier father who disappeared for good when Rimbaud was 6.

Royauté

Un beau matin, chez un peuple fort doux, un homme et une femme superbes criaient sur la place publique. «Mes amis, je veux qu’elle soit reine!» «Je veux être reine!» Elle riait et tremblait. Il parlait aux amis de révélation, d’épreuve terminée. Ils se pâmaient lun contre l’autre.

En effet ils furent rois toute toute une matinée où les tentures carminées se relevèrent sur les maisons, et toute l´après-midi, où ils sávancérent du côté des jardins de palmes.

Royalty

One fine morning, in the country of a very gentle people, a magnificent man and woman were shouting in the public square. “My friends, I want her to be queen!” “I want to be queen!” She was laughing and trembling. He spoke to their friends of revelation, of trials completed. They swooned against each other.

In fact they were regents for a whole morning as crimson hangings were raised against the houses, and for the whole afternoon, as they moved toward the groves of palm trees.

Source: Rimbaud, Arthur, and John Ashbery. Illuminations. New York: W.W. Norton, 2012, pp. 52-53.

One Hundred Uses For a Fern

Wikipedia Poem, No. 780

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“A change in the concept of sexual identity is essential if we are not going to see the old political order reassert itself in every new revolution. … The charisma of Man seems to come purely from his power over [women] and his control over the world by force, not from anything fertile or life-giving in him.” Adrienne Rich, from “When We Dead Awaken”, 1971

ask before the hand privilege grant figurative praerogatin privilege grant comitia populi tributa with tribus cently with tribus cently a favor or privilege grant to stretch out the hand from privilege grant first in the roman comitia populi tributa from prae ask before voting to voters who by lot reg move in privilege grant figurativirus chosen who by lot voters rally a stretch out the roman comitia populi tributa noun use of 100 vote first from rogative use or election from lative 14c in praerogative use of 100 vote 14c in a favor late 14c in anglolative use of fern