Empedocles and Exaenetus (Wikipoem for My Father)

Wikipedia Poem, No. 824

PROVE2D

yr head if  only he cared     
down their hooves spectacular  
the riders' blood spilled    as much for me  
but i   was a  wrestler  and  was a   wrestler 
and was  a farce another   wrapped around  their hooves 
spectacular the riderstand was a   wrestler 
and  was a farce vested spectacular  
the great heft  of   the   riderstand 
was a    wrestler  and  a farce      
as much for me as for

touching their hooves   spectacular 
their thighs before  touching their  
spectacular root of    riderstand 
was a   wrestler and     each other    a   wrestler 
and given  no horse i was a  wrestler and    
each other  wrapped  around     each other  
given no horse  
the root of   their hooves   spectacular  
their hooves spectacular  the   great heft of  their hooves 
spectacular their   hooves   spectacular 
the riders'   blood  spilled     as   much for me 
but i  was a   wrestler

List of Ancient Greek Tribes (Vincenzo Peruggia)

Wikipedia Poem, No. 728

greektribes-71

“The agents of the statue came finally to stare out the window of the room at the statue, as they dreamed and died. // There was an eaten who was oranged by a child to a ceiling a please and a lobster that said basket when a house was in a man.” Russell Edson

achaebi
aean curethinyans
aebi yans aoi
aeges aoi
aegiaebi epes
aegyes
aemones
aoi curethinyans
aoi eordeans
aoi epes
aoi minyans
aoi phikrans
aoi yans
aones
bottian
cadmeans
cretes epeioi
cretes krans
curetapithikes tes
dryopeioi
dryopelchaeans
eordeans
epeioi
kranaoi
kranes
kylianaones
kylians
kyliantes
kylikes
kylikrans
kylistinoans
lasgians
lasgiantes
mikes
mikranes
minesaeans
minyan
phikes
phikes tes
phikran
philians leges
phinyans tes
tapithikes
tapithikes
tapithioi
tes telchaebi

Come: Debug

Wikipedia Poem, No. 706

come-debug-homer

“There [Athena] found the lordly suitors sitting on hides … Quick attentive house slaves were waiting on them … Some were mixing wine with water … others carved up heaping plates of meat. … Telemachus was sitting with them, feelings dejected. In his mind he saw his father coming from somewhere, scattering the suitors, and gaining back his honor, and control of his property. With this in his mind, he was the first to see Athena there.” The Odyssey, trans. Emily Wilson

ONE
    
   e 
ndkeg shwnn  tt'eng 
        
        e inhaw
      f geas d.c. el trta gks ovaklo bodon e 
e
          eeosemrl el
      
t 
s'l 
ert 
behonce

TWO

chiny
    min't 
        melerésun i hanorry 
        wane i 
     el calfee sofe sung rin'man ath weave 
sore h'rs pe sorr 
       en 

THREE

aybe
and resume stat andiamo 
      be ant to wandentant knor 
sorrom
      un and tols gol 
       med self med ell em soon

FOUR
 
        on and 
      stir scales 
          one 
trapped hide
       decide 
      so    don't care
red see supermarket
no warmth 
no want

FIVE

so don't care
          red reed  
      red 
      résumé 
hide history's hide
    strong 
      wine 
by volume 
          
asermixtus

SIX

warmth 
     
         minor scales 
        ferry want to sorry so don't 
         care
red hide
chosen sides 

SEVEN

  wants to 
   read 
        and 
   write on an elementary level 
metonym red 
        reed metonym
    right and have mirrored scales 
what fault
to discern choice and choose

EIGHT

         and have minor scaled 
feelings 
golden
      sun the want to stir 
          steel 
          
      read write on 
an 
elementary 
level 
        wandentant knor sorrom

NINE

elementary
trapped looking into the mirror
what enough no the want to be 
sorry but            e inhaw 

TEN

       make the wrong 
      tell 
    again 
         colors 
slither through 
   the mirror
       what 
      enough no the want to 
be 
sorry soon and sung

Polyphemus in Napa

Wikipedia Poem, No. 655

W655-SM

all that mighty oneself
one sees stretch online
glassed by the trees
its easy eye
and wine glasses
lost in branches
by the pain that’s
remembered
her sea bottom
home for suede

flash stupid
save oneself
from love you
see selfless be
come classless
seawine in a park
ing lot terrible
things unfriendly
things how much love
is parking one
sees measure sees
love love
is what one sees
oneself flash io
then flash
something else
no longer seen

Strange Candy

Wikipedia Poem, No. 613

w613b-sm

“Crack, crack, old ship! so long as thou crackest, thou holdest!” Melville

xerxes burrows into his thing-pink shirt for safety     i never said 
he plays with geometry    not consciously however    i 
pity him    welcome him to his soul    where 
hallucinations manifest themselves     into the guy or gal
the bloodpool    dreams of the battle of thermopylae     sit down 
hero     he wants a backyard with high fences     he wants 
to be the president 
very badly      darius sends emissaries to each greek city-state
information passes through still photographs until xerxes' body
emerges

 

‘she uses her height, leaning into the crowd, moving her face close and staring fiercely, between screams and maniacal laughs’

Wikipedia Poem, No. 609

“Still, there are ways / of touching without bulldozing.” Ruth Madievsky

windspill
sail between
make it surreal   easy 
name a standup comic 
that could be   anyone
so we'll make it   easier
name a standup comic 
called salvador didion née carlin
ok   that   could be anyone
so we'll make it   sleazier
name a standup comic   remover 
a 40-year spill 
spot a 50-year turn 
into his own unique breakfast 
one-liners that kill a tourist spill- 
spot   a place and now he’s gone
tell me   about some   people       
who were   here
here there   here where   anywhere
hear hear   name a   dear preamble no       
preamble   no surrealistic buildup 
or any kind of fan service 
less rhodes straddled coffee   helios          
possibility to work with   voice made kind joke    
them haha yokes   or maybe little zen koans       
disguised as arid hardpan 
call out   morning coffee 
give helios at rhodes something
to work with   war   made kind joke 
or maybe   more or less

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Sources:

George Seferis (1900-1971)


“But to say what you want to say, you must create another language and nourish it for years and years with what you have loved, with what you have lost, with what you will never find again. ”

Seferis, as quoted in Mary Ruefle’s “Madness, Rack, and Honey”, p. 191.

‘Delirium for the Four Legs of a Love’ by Dimitris Athinakis (trans. Karen Emmerich)

IMG_7524

I see your yesses coming from afar
and my own, like candles,
brandish
and burn
awaiting the centuries

A strong wind
carries off my hat my glasses my tattoo my arm
        carries off
my leg and an eye

       [I'm left there smiling before jets
        gushing the joy of nothingness]

joy —
 it too alone

Stay, if you want, by my side
— even if no one understands us

        [Why let that, too, smother us]

Just let it flow
let time
the wine
the smoke
flow

spacer1

Source:

  • Athinakis, Dimitris. “Delirium for the Four Legs of a Love.” Translated by Karen Emmerich. Austerity Measures: The New Greek Poetry, edited by Karen Van Dyck, New York: New York Review of Books, 2016, p. 11.

Additional reading:

Poetess

poetess-sm

if one would iridesce greed one
two three patterns emerge
one skin of ochre
two blood like blood
three one can do nothing to
embrace one’s poetess
hang a snare one two three
from the nose of a fox one two three
what awaits one there one
spiked leather collar two
three a black vinyl dress
one’s beard dewless skin
covered in iridian mess

Wikipedia Poem, No. 249

wiki249

“Does … hope [pervade] our century? Perhaps, but poetry does not confirm that impression, and it is a more reliable witness than journalism. If something cannot be verified on a deeper level, that of poetry, it is not, we may suspect, authentic.” Czeslaw Milosz

 

disdain greek daimonion
a divine principle in the original
mythological sense using it

render to the demon what is his old
english feend or dest-inctions and
vulgate bulging god of eyes

fat hen and vulgate fortune
a loved toy church fathers
and vulgate for purposes of deuil

christian greek daimonion in hellcniht
literally hellcniht literally hellcniht literally
hellcniht hellcniht hell hell hell literally hell

of poets’ come
though it’s where
that must be he

the disclosure of poetry
is rightly said to be
the disclosure of poets

though it’s there where
that he must be
an exaggeration

to maintain that he must be
he a disclosure put to
shame by the daimonion

though it’s why poets come
it’s an exaggeration i guess
to say poets come from shame

john hepburn is dead
force of white dying
a gay brother the seafarer

and during sodomy
the street coterie is known
the sex violent and convicted

as for sodomy who turns
who operates a seafarer
unruly offensive drummer boy

a business opportunity
provided by the reverend
sinister society anti-oedipus

the most sinister priest-manipulators
psychoanalysis as unanswerable
pilloried analysts in capitalist disorder

daimonion demonstrations
widely regarded as unanswerable
pilloried writers thinkers motorcycle

repairmen unanswerable and indicted
psychoanalysis as capitalist disorder
analysis pilloried and then indicted

an oiled lacanian camp in paris
literary critics pilloried become
unanswerable almost sinister

the priest-manifold tripartite thing
commissioned to be an american
academic and imaginary pleasure

chosen to embody the aesthetics
of a garbage dump he was himself
an era of absurdity in january

his photographs inspired
the british to subject germans
to vulgata aesthetics ad copy

daimonion burning pleasant 

paculum-spec2-sm

Sources:

  • “Demon.” Online Etymology Dictionary. 2001. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • “Lacanianism.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 6 Apr. 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • Miłosz, Czesław. Ars Poetica? 1988. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • Miłosz, Czesław. The Witness of Poetry. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1983. Print. Page 16.
  • “Slavoj Žižek.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 4 July 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.
  • “Vere street coterie.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 9 Jan. 2016. Web. 7 July 2016.