In Which, Further Reading, No. 1

pinecone

Marcus Wicker’s Silencer is very good. I’ve spent a lot of time with its poems, yet it’s not enough. Wicker is sharp in this interview with Kathleen Rooney at the Poetry Foundation. You will come out more alive after reading both/either. Wicker:

  • “Poetry won’t save your life, at least not without (self) action. But a well-wrought language object can deliver a lightning bolt of feeling married to intelligence that’s capable of stirring readers into any number of outward actions and interior reactions. That’s power and magic enough for me.”
  • “I take my hip-hop influences as seriously as my literary heroes, and I’d like others to do so as well.”

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Over at the New Statesman, Jason Murugesu argues that Kanye West is “our first metaphysical rapper”. One might feel a gentle pop as their optic nerves retreat from their aggressively rolling eyes when, five graphs in, Murugesu writes: “According to Encyclopedia Britannica, Donne’s metaphysical poetry is “characterised by conceit or ‘wit'”. But keep going, the lay argument builds a compelling case, not for his intended point, but, for looking at contemporary artists with disengaged distance. Murugesu:

Not everything is so highbrow though. West and Donne enjoy a similar taste for puns made in poor taste. Donne’s The Good Morrow describes his thoughts as he awakes next to his lover. In it, Donne makes his now infamous sexual pun where he references his lover’s “country pleasures”.

The opening of West’s “Mercy” features the rapper Big Sean trying to make a similar pun on the word “ass” (throughout the song, multiple rappers featured on the song compare women to the super-car, the Lamborghini Mercy).

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Another reading suggestion — this one a deeper investment  — is “Tradition and Innovation in Hellenistic Poetry” first published in Italian in 2002, and translated by Cambridge University Press in 2004. Marco Fantuzzi and Richard Hunter take a monographic look at the poetry of the third and second centuries BC, and engage in close readings of “some of the most famous Greek poetry of the Hellenistic period”. It’s a scholarly text, so the reading isn’t as immediately accessible as either the interview or the internet errata above, but the first 43 pages are available to read on Google Books; try it out. I’m a zealous believer in the fact that this kind of information shouldn’t only be read between the dire walls of a university classroom. This stuff can be great fun. One representative sentence:

  • The intensive philological scholarship of the third century BC, which sought to describe and classify literary forms of the past, may have facilitated the contamination of traditional genres.

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And finally, some suggested reading from the last few weeks on wikipoem.org:

Bottlebells

bucolic clangors suspend themselves
behind the slow rise and in their teeth
hear crickets

Violence / In modest tints arrayed / Within the silent shade

euclid measures across the lull of a dog and me steaming
a mouthful of rod starvations of posture impeccable

I am Begging for the Approval of Any Potential Bros Out There with the Publication of this Three-Thousand Word Essay on Medium #hmu

          ‪men   stumble 
in spring street on flip flops and 
     broadway   phantom lovers   
phantoms   their damn selves

After Reading a Page and a Half of Tradition and Innovation in Hellenistic Poetry

           unreached but unreachable
this 
   condition is
the key then to 
         to verdant madness

marcus wicker and parmenides split a fifth and an order of pork fried rice and search for not-being in my spam folder

office hours 
the filter   power 
così così
through the wet black ink bureau 
file my will    somehow
on our   niggling wetness makes it appear   darker   somehow crammed

Wikipedia Poem, No. 92

"An accident is when a thing happens. A coincidence is when a thing is going to happen and does." Gertrude Stein

“An accident is when a thing happens. A coincidence is when a thing is going to happen and does. … Anything anybody writes is written. … Everybody listen. … You can refuse if you refuse you can refuse to explain when you have written.” Gertrude Stein

Pleased
To do.
One   

To do.
Met 
Oh.
    
Or  
Towering.
No   
     
Her   
Later
Pleased
  
I want.   
To do.
Turning.
        
Pleased
Later
Thoroughly
  

Is that.
A question.

  
To 
do.     
Was a disappointment
             
Victim.
Mispronounced
Towering.
Who   
 
By.   
I
Victim.

Spelling.           
Mispronounced.         
Met I        

Sunday study. 
Nature.
Wipe what.

Sources:
Stein, Gertrude. “Henry James.” Writings 1932-1946. Eds. Catherine R. Stimpson, Harriet Chessman. New York: The Library of America, 1998. Print.
—. “Study Nature.” Poetry Foundation. N.D. Web. 16 July 2015.
Filreis, Al, Maxe Crandall, Julia Bloch, and Sarah Dowling. “The Fuck-you Bow (PoemTalk #90).” Podcast. Jacket2.org. Poetry Foundation, 6 July 2015. Web. 16 July 2015.

Wikipedia Poem, No. 84

carvingboardriver-1

“Her job was to set the house in order.” Raymond Carver

Carver  
calm soda 
     and 
     chasing 
      to 
drink 
 50 year

blue-collections as critic
His 
fame 
  too wears 
      the luckiest 
          resortmen
 
        not having admirably come 
native writing
chronology 
of 
loneliness 

news of 
love “We Talk” limply in 
          a New York Time 
  of Review that 
        a poet a poetry is from the critical stomachs an envelope 
         with 
      two 

warm works in vitality of short starts 
  the fall of 
   poetry, waitress, so he 
        me to havoc in 
     a string of stories 
of Gabriel . . . . . . 
. . . 
        . . 
       . . 
        . . . 
  . . 
         . 
    . 

       the 
technique. 

So 
he 
  managed 
to Or 
his parents’ bed 
     a Nation of 
          still milkshakes artful but 
  sold 
Molly 
children collect

one aware 
touch 
of 
          a lifelong 
movie 

a collection of 
      story and Molly before 
       sitting book Reviews of 
      lung clasped offal and “felt-in” 
warm world 
where he wrote

      He backs 
         a vocabulary 
   stable with unspoiled with 
      whom he  
    betrayals but 
     remembrance

a story of 
        last looking too weary far 
    for

Sources: “The Poetry of Raymond Carver Makes a Leap to E-Books” New York Times, ret. 5/27/2015; “Raymond Carver 1938-1988” Poetry Foundation, ret. 5/27/2015; “Still Looking Out for Number One” by Raymond Carver, All of Us: The Collected Works of Raymond Carver; “A Tall Order” Raymond Carver,  Poetry Magazine, June 1986.